Do Magic Mushrooms Interact with Antidepressants? (It’s Time You Know!)

Do Magic Mushrooms Interact with Antidepressants? (It’s Time You Know!)

You’ve been taking antidepressants but are considering trying microdosing magic mushrooms to see if they help…The thing you need to know is: do magic mushrooms interact with your antidepressants? Can you microdose magic mushrooms as a tool to wean yourself off antidepressants? Here’s the truth.

First of all, we need to be straight up with you. We aren’t doctors and we aren’t pretending to be. We know your health is your most precious resource and encourage you to use all the resources and professionals you have at your disposal to care for yourself.

Second, there are no completed human scientific studies that make any conclusions about how psilocybin (magic) mushrooms may affect anti-depressants. While animal studies about the effects of psilocybin are promising, remember, you are not a rat.

Do magic mushrooms interact with antidepressants? The answer isn’t as simple as you think.

This Might Be For You, But it Might Not Be. Do This One Thing Anyway…

Your doctor may or may not agree with you trying to wean yourself off your medications. We know for some people, medication will and should be part of your wellness plan for life. However, if microdosing is something you want to do, it is better to do it with their advice and support than without any professional help.

If your general practitioner is not very empathetic and/or supportive, it may be worthwhile to ask for a referral to a psychiatrist as they will be better versed in treatments using psychedelic drugs.

Warning: people who are living with psychosis, schizophrenia and bi-polar disorder are not considered good candidates for microdosing mushrooms.

What Happened When She Replaced Antidepressants by Microdosing Magic Mushrooms

Claudia’s story is powerful and it is real. If microdosing is working for her, can it for you?

Why You Need to Know About Serotonin Syndrome

One of the goals of microdosing magic mushrooms and antidepressants is to balance serotonin levels in the brain to stabilize mood. If you are not taking any prescription medications and do not have any health conditions, you are likely in a great position to begin microdosing mushrooms if you have done your research and feel this is the best solution for you.

However, many people are receiving treatment for depression and are taking medication to help them cope with the symptoms. If you are already taking medications, the decision to microdose requires more consideration.

If you are taking antidepressants, odds are they are in a class of drugs known as SSRIs. SSRI stands for Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors are prescribed for depression, PTSD, OCD, and other anxiety disorders. This is the most common class of antidepressants and some of the most commonly prescribed ones are:

Some common SSRIs are:

  • Dapoxetine (Priligy)
  • Escitalopram (Cipralex, Lexapro)
  • Fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem)
  • Citalopram (Cipramil)
  • Sertraline (Zoloft, Lustral)
  • Fluvoxamine (Faverin, Luvox)
  • Vortioxetine (Viibryd)

Please note these are not the only drugs used to treat mental health conditions or that coupld potentially have negative interactions with psilocybin. We have chosen to focus on SSRIs because they encompass most of the drugs people are prescribed for depression and anxiety.

SSRIs balance serotonin levels by trying to prevent nerve cells (serotonin receptors) from grabbing onto serotonin. This means more serotonin is available for the brain, which causes the release of certain hormones that make you feel happy.

Some people’s nerve cells are better at grabbing serotonin than others’. Too good in fact, so the brain doesn’t get what it needs to make them feel good. They are typically prescribed SSRIs .

If you are taking SSRIs, the effects of microdosing magic mushrooms may be reduced.

Imagine this.

You are watching a football game.

The tight end and defensive line (the SSRI drugs) are trying to protect the quarterback (the serotonin receptor).

At the same time, the offensive line (the magic mushrooms in the microdose) are trying their hardest to sack the quarterback… but this isn’t easy because the quarterback has an amazing defensive line protecting him.

Football can be used to explain how microdosing and SSRI drugs interact.

In other words, SSRIs block the serotonin receptors while psilocybin is trying to bind to the receptors. Since the psilocybin is being blocked by the defensive SSRIs, it is possible the antidepressants will reduce the effect of microdosing.

This has been proven with another psychedelic substance, LSD, in one study 

Psilocybin (Magic) Mushrooms and Antidepressants, Do They Mix? Here’s the Evidence.

The possible worst case scenario of mixing antidepressants and microdosing, is that you would experience serotonin syndrome. The symptoms of serotonin syndrome include:

  • High blood pressure
  • Confusion
  • Agitation
  • Diarrhea
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Tremors
  • Shivering
  • Sweating
  • Dilated pupils
  • Nausea and / or vomiting

Though very rare, symptoms may be more severe or possibly even deadly, including: high fever, seizures, irregular heartbeats and unconsciousness. Because of this risk we think it is always important to check with your health care provider(s) before beginning any new wellness plan. It is important to be aware of pre-existing and existing health conditions and how ANY medication (including medications that look after your physical health) may interact with microdosing magic mushrooms.

Can Microdosing Magic Mushrooms Help You Taper Off Antidepressants?

We wish we could give you a crystal clear answer to this question because it is one we get asked frequently.

Do people microdose magic mushrooms while they are tapering off antidepressants?

Yes.

Is there a protocol we could suggest or recommend for doing this?

No.

Does it work?

For some people, but not others. We have heard testimonials and talked with people who feel they have been successful in using microdosing mushrooms as a tool to wean themselves off antidepressants. There is no way to measure how well it worked and how safe this was for them. They just shared their own experiences.

If microdosing psilocybin is non-toxic, has no known side effects, then why shouldn’t you use psychedelics while using or tapering off antidepressants?

There are some other reasons that antidepressants and psychedelics may not be good to use at the same time. One study found that antidepressants when combined with psychedelics could cause you to feel more disconnected and make you resort to more passive mechanisms for coping (2).

In contrast, one of the main reasons people like using psychedelic substances to treat mental health conditions is because they feel more emotionally connected to their life than they do when on antidepressants.

It is possible combining antidepressants with microdosing mushrooms could be either complementary or counterproductive! It is our opinion that using drugs that repress emotion with drugs that bring up emotion simultaneously may be counter-intuitive.

Microdosing isn’t the latest diet or fitness craze. Magic mushrooms are more than a supplement… they are a natural medicine.

Our goal is not to tell people who are on antidepressants there is no way they can wean off them and do this, but we do know this a significant grey area and we don’t ever want to beat around the bush about the risks.

Conclusion

If you are reading this, there is a good chance you are fed up. Fed up with struggling, side effects, the system, the law, pseudoscience, the pharmaceutical industry. We understand how you feel and it is okay to be SO. OVER. IT.

Are you fed up with conventional treatment for depression and anxiety and wondering if microdosing mushrooms is for you?

Ultimately, only you can answer for how you feel and what you have experienced with symptoms of depression and anxiety.

You are fortunate to live in an era where there is endless information and advice available to you. Resources are truly endless and growing by the second. What you do to heal your body is something you are free to choose. You may even “feel in your bones” what your body needs.

If you sense this is your journey, listen to that inner voice and explore the possibility. We are here to promote awareness and education.

There have been studies recently that have researchers at Imperial College London optimistic that magic mushrooms could replace antidepressants as soon as 5 years from now (1). When that time comes there will be millions of people wanting to make the switch from conventional medical treatment for depression to microdosing. It is likely there will be research and recommendations on this topic by then that will be reasons for optimism.

Going off antidepressants is not easy for most people, so if discontinuation is something you are considering, this article from Harvard Medical School is a well-written and accurate reference.

Regardless of what kind of medicine you are using to treat depression and anxiety, it is important to use other tools to help you succeed like intention setting. We have made a great video and blog post that shows how this can be a game changer for you.

If you would like to learn more on this topic: Do magic mushrooms interact with anti-depressants, we deliver even more information in this video.

Have confidential questions about microdosing magic mushrooms? We get it. You can reach us by completing the secure contact form below. Please note we do not sell psilocybin magic mushroom products or offer referrals for sources.

We wrote “A Complete Beginners Guide to Microdosing Psilocybin Mushrooms” to reveal to you the SECRETS and SHOCKING TRUTH about how microdosing can help with human optimization, depression and anxiety. It features incredible HERBS FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION that work well for thousands upon thousands of people!

Check out the Complete Beginners Guide To Microdosing Psilocybin Mushrooms HERE

References
  1. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/magic-mushroom-depression-psychedelic-drug-mental-health-antidepressant-big-pharma-imperial-lsd-dmt-a8929796.html
  2. Carhart-Harris, R.L. and D.J. Nutt, Serotonin and brain function: a tale of two receptors. J Psychopharmacol, 2017. 31(9): p. 1091-1120.

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